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 What it Means to be Lucky

The Manner Of Listening To Or Reading The Teachings
Khenpo Tsultrim Gyamtso Rinpoche,
translated by Ari Goldfield
Excerpted from the transcript of "A Commentary On What It Means To Be Lucky" (Vancouver 1998)
Originally published in Bodhi Issue 3
1 of 4 | 1, 2, 3, 4

Khenpo Rinpoche and DPRRinpoche asks that before we begin listening to the teachings, we give rise to the precious attitude of bodhicitta. This means that we aspire to attain the state of perfect and complete enlightenment which abides neither in the cycle of existence nor in some one-sided type of static peace. He asks that we do that, not for our own benefit, but for the benefit of all sentient beings, who are as limitless in number as space is vast in its extent.  In order to do this, we know we must listen to, reflect on, and meditate on the teachings of the genuine dharma with all of the enthusiasm we can muster in our hearts.  This is the precious attitude of bodhicitta. Please give rise to it and listen. 

Tonight, Rinpoche will explain to us his song, What it Means to be Lucky: the Excellent Path Laid with Precious Gems . Rinpoche composed this song in verse form so that it would be easy for everyone to understand, and easy for us to memorize and sing, if we want to learn it by heart. That's very good for us. Also, if we are studying dharma language, if we're studying Tibetan in order to further our understanding of dharma, then there are many dharma words in this song. If we learn these words by heart, our dharma vocabulary in Tibetan will expand.

Next: The Four Thoughts That Turn The Mind To Buddhist Teachings
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